December 2003 - Posts

Worst Technology of 2003 - Paperless Voting

Best Technology of 2003 - The Camera Phone

10 Technologies to watch in 2004

[via Business 2.0]

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SQLite is an embeddable SQL database engine which can perform upto two times faster than PostgreSQL and MySQL for many common operations. With a small memory footprint and support for databases upto 2 terabyte, its an ideal option for embedded and small to medium-scale deployments. And SQLite works like a charm with the .NET Framework. Following are some of the options available to interact with the SQLite server from your .NET code:

[Update] DotNetSQLiteAdmin is a tool written in ASP.NET intended to handle the administration of SQLite databases over the Web. Currently it can create/drop databases and tables, vacuum databases/tables, execute SQL statement, a automated data entry form. (Related: Web-based Database Administration for SQL Server)

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Amazon.com's feature for searching within books, introduced in October, now has competition. Google, the leading search engine, is testing a similar, unnamed service, introduced about two weeks ago with no publicity. When used with regular Google searches, the feature returns links to passages within books. It can also be used separately. For example, to see references within books to quilts, a visitor would type quilts site:print.google.com

About Google Print (Beta)

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I came across dotnetcoders.com while searching for a UI component on Google. The site hasn't been updated in months but I did find some nice articles on their site:

And their RegEx cartoon is cracking :)

The Delhi .NET Developers Group presents interactive sessions on Assemblies and .NET Remoting, on 21st December 2003.

Assemblies : Inside preview of a .NET Assembly -- We will be discussing the purpose of an assembly as well as related concepts such as metadata, modules, and the broad difference between private and shared assemblies, as well as the basic techniques for compiling high level code into assemblies - so we're going to go a bit beyond that and look at the underlying structure of assemblies.

NET Remoting : Introduction to .NET Remoting and Distributed Computing -- Since the announcement of .NET, a lot of attention has been paid to the new inter-application communication possibilities offered by Web Services. But in fact, the code technology in .NET for communication between distributed application components is .NET Remoting. Remoting is the successor to Microsoft DCOM, and enables .NET Application developers to easily access code running on remote computers.

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Microsoft tech writers explain in this downloadable document (539 kb) some of the biggest changes on tap Windows XP Service Pack 2 — the first beta of which is due for unveiling any day now. [via Neowin]

A few days back, I was wondering how small can a binary executable get (without compression etc.) - when compiled in basically any programming environment. .NET MSIL code may not quite qualify but some of the demos I came across simply blew my mind. But then again - who said Assembly Language died? Checkout the demos at theproduct, the zoom3 demo and some “larger” demos (actually less than 256 bytes) at 256b.com.

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mo8il seems to be one of the first real & live ASP.NET application powered by Mono. [Via Miguel]

MSDN Sessions on ASP.NET: Best Practices and Techniques for Building Secure ASP.NET Applications are scheduled from 9th to 18th December 2003 in 6 Indian cities. More details ...
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Spiritual Transformation in the Halls of High Technology - Kraig Brockschmidt, former employee of Microsoft wrote this draft copy for his (new) book. Not sure if its been published yet or not but its very interesting. Its not about MS's products or about arguments over Linux/OpenSource etc. Its about the spiritual transformation which the author went through during his 8 years of work at MS. [via Ramesh]

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Maybe I've mentioned this one before but its worth it! The creators of ASP.NET are coming to a city near you. This is your chance to receive FREE, in-depth training on Microsoft's web development platform. So do go catch the ASP.NET Exposed Roadshow. Sadly I'm 7469 miles away :(

Also checkout the Visual Studio .NET 2003 Automation Samples.

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