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July 2010 - Posts

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Announcing WebMatrix – a small, simple and seamless stack for Web developers

Today my team launched an exciting new project called WebMatrix .  Seamless, small and best of all free, WebMatrix includes a complete Web development stack that installs in minutes and elegantly integrates a Web server, database and programming frameworks into a single, integrated experience. Use WebMatrix to streamline the way you code, test, and deploy your own ASP.NET and PHP Web site, or start a new site using the world’s most popular open source apps like DotNetNuke, Umbraco, WordPress, or Joomla. WebMatrix is the easiest way to learn Web development and makes it simple to build and publish Web sites on the internet. Start with Web standards including HTML, CSS and JavaScript and then connect to a database or add in dynamic server...
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Microsoft WebMatrix in Context and Deploying Your First Site

  ScottGu announced Microsoft WebMatrix Beta today. It's a small (15 megs if you have .NET 4, 50megs if you don't) lightweight IDE for making ASP.NET or PHP websites. It has a small embedded file-based SQL Database, and a web-server called IIS Express that's compatible with the full version of IIS. It uses a View Engine called "Razor" to make Web Pages, and your sites can be later be expanded to use all of ASP.NET MVC. It's a simple syntax that is easy to learn It uses the WebDeploy engine to deploy apps to hosts, setting up permissions, copying databases, etc. WebMatrix also has the Search Engine Optimization Toolkit built in, so you can spider your own site and see how Search Engines see it. It'll make recommendations...
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07-06-2010, 3:39 PM

Introducing WebMatrix

Last week I published several blog posts that covered some new web development technologies we are releasing: IIS Developer Express : A lightweight web-server that is simple to setup, free, works with all versions of Windows, and is compatible with the full IIS 7.5. SQL Server Compact Edition : A lightweight file-based database that is simple to setup, free, can be embedded within your ASP.NET applications, supports low-cost hosting environments, and enables databases to be optionally migrated to SQL Server. ASP.NET “Razor” : A new view-engine option for ASP.NET that enables a code-focused templating syntax optimized around HTML generation.  You can use “Razor” to easily embed VB or C# within HTML.  It’s syntax is easy to write, simple...
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Windows Client Developer Roundup for 7/5/2010

This is Windows Client Developer roundup #31. The Windows Client Developer Roundup aggregates information of interest to Windows Client Developers, including WPF , Silverlight , Visual C++, XNA , Expression Blend , Surface , Windows 7, Windows Forms, Windows Phone and Visual Studio. If you have something interesting you've done or have run across, or you blog regularly on the topics included here, please send me the URL and brief description via the contact link on my blog. WPF and Silverlight General Software should: Adapt to desired size/aspect ration; crash less; remember user settings (Rob Relyea) Also: Software should allow checkbox's label to check Tips and Tricks for working with the WPF and Silverlight Designer in VS2010 (Karl...
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Web Deploy Parameterization in Action

A few weeks back I explained the key differences between Web.Config Transformation and Web Deploy (aka MSDeploy) Parameterization…  Before you read this post I recommend that you read Transformation vs. Parameterization post, it is tiny and will clear few fundamentals… Automatic Parameterization Before I dive in more let me clarify that if you are using VS 2010 then in common scenarios you may not even need to do custom parameterization, coz VS 2010 already parameterizes things like IIS Application Name, Application physical installation directory and connectionStrings… So when you actually create a web deploy .zip package you can easily build it once and deploy it several number of times by changing the parameters values… Custom Parameterization...
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Razor View Syntax

There’s an old saying, “Good things come to those who wait.” I remember when I first joined the ASP.NET MVC project, I (and many customers) wanted to include a new streamlined custom view engine. Unfortunately at the time, it wasn’t in the card since we had higher priority features to implement. Well the time for a new view engine has finally come as announced by Scott Guthrie in this very detailed blog post . While I’m very excited about the new streamlined syntax, there’s a lot under the hood I’m also excited about. Andrew Nurse , who writes the parser for the Razor syntax, provides more under-the-hood details in this blog post . Our plan for the next version of ASP.NET MVC is to make this the new default view engine, but for backwards compatibility...
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07-03-2010, 2:01 AM

Introducing “Razor” – a new view engine for ASP.NET

One of the things my team has been working on has been a new view engine option for ASP.NET. ASP.NET MVC has always supported the concept of “view engines” – which are the pluggable modules that implement different template syntax options.  The “default” view engine for ASP.NET MVC today uses the same .aspx/.ascx/.master file templates as ASP.NET Web Forms.  Other popular ASP.NET MVC view engines used today include Spark and NHaml . The new view-engine option we’ve been working on is optimized around HTML generation using a code-focused templating approach. The codename for this new view engine is “Razor”, and we’ll be shipping the first public beta of it shortly. Design Goals We had several design goals in mind as we prototyped and...
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Coaxing the Calendar Control – Which should have been called the Date-Picker Control.

Sometimes you need to dig in a little to get things to work the way that you want. I’m working on an events calendar and I need specific behavior for the home page display. When the page initially renders, I want to display a list of events in the current month. Then, I want to modify the display based on the user’s interaction. If the user picks a date then I want to display only the events on that day. If the user navigates to a different month I want to display the events for that month, even if they previously choose a specific day. To do this I need to do the equivalent of a SQL SELECT based on EITHER the Day or the Month depending on the users choices. The code for this was easy but figuring out exactly what to do in relation to the controls...
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Installing, Configuring and Using Windows Server AppFabric and the "Velocity" Memory Cache in 10 minutes

A few weeks back I blogged about the Windows Server AppFabric launch (AppFabric is Microsoft's "Application Server") and a number of folks had questions about how to install and configure the "Velocity" memory cache. It used to be kind of confusing during the betas but it's really easy now that it's released. Here's the comment: Have you tried to setup a appfabric (velocity) instance ? I suggest you try & even do a blog post, maybe under the scenario of using it like a memcache for dasblog. I would love to know how to setup it up, it's crazy hard for what it is. No problem, happy to help. I won't do it for dasblog, but I'll give you easy examples that'll take about 10 minutes. Get and Install...
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Oh yeah, CallStream is great to express monads

It has been pointed out by several commenters that CallStream was a reinvention of monads. Not quite so, but the nuance is subtle. CallStream is a pattern to express chain-callable APIs. That makes it possible to express monads with CallStream , but in the same way that JavaScript functions and C# delegates do. Expressing monads with CallStreams can be done in a way that is quite expressive, but let me switch from the usual C# to JavaScript for that (I can’t think of a strongly-typed C# expression of the same thing, but feel free to prove me wrong in the comments). Here’s the code for the monad: function identity(value) { var bind = function (operation) { return operation(value); } bind.value = value; return bind; } And here’s how you would...
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