Contents tagged with Orchard

  • Identity in Orchard Import/Export

    Orchard has a really neat concept of identity that’s mainly used when importing contents into the CMS. One of the difficulties with importing contents is that you need to make sure that you can import not just new items, but also updates to existing items. For this to work consistently, we need to be able to identify a content item reliably.

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  • Opting out of anti-forgery validation in Orchard

    Anti-forgery tokens are a very important security feature of ASP.NET MVC and Orchard. Most of the time, you should keep them in place, and just let the system work its magic. There are a few rare situations however where it’s not the appropriate protection and you’ll want to disable it. Being too lazy to include the token in your ajax requests or your forms is of course not one of those situations.

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  • Reducing coupling with dynamic languages

    I’m learning Node currently, after years of doing ASP.NET MVC, and a bit of Python on a couple of projects. There are lots of habits to shake off, and there are things that I miss (such as ASP’s outstanding model binding), but there is also a very liberating power in JavaScript, that lets you do things in a much more straightforward and even cleaner way than you would otherwise. There’s a lot less ceremony, and you can focus on what counts. One thing that keeps astonishing me is how I can make my Node modules work together without coupling them.

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  • WebAPI actions in Orchard

    Building WebAPI controllers in Orchard is fairly simple: just inherit from System.Web.Http.ApiController. You’ll then be able to inject dependencies exactly in the same way that you would anywhere in Orchard. WebAPI is designed so that the default behavior is that a controller represents a category of resources, such as a product, an article, etc. There’s a bunch of conventions in place so that just naming the methods on the controllers is enough to wire them up. If this REST-like behavior is what you’re after, that’s great, just apply the conventions and you’re good to go. If you need to stray from that model, and implement something closer to what you’d do with a regular MVC controller, you’ll need to do a little more work.

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  • Building a WebAPI route in Orchard

    There’s a number of differences between regular MVC controllers and WebAPI controllers that make the latter much more suitable to building APIs: they are REST-centric, they can negotiate the format of the answer, etc. Implementing WebAPI controllers in Orchard is really simple. First, you need a route, and that will be the subject of this post.

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  • Cleanly getting a WebAPI action URL

    Whenever you need to get the URL of a ASP.NET MVC action, you should use Url.Action (where URL is an instance of UrlHelper), and never hard-code the URL. This way, the URL is dynamically constructed from the available information in the Url.Action parameters and in the route table. If the route is changed, the results of the Url.Action call will change accordingly, and everything will continue to work. The same principles, of course, apply to WebAPI actions.

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  • Adding dependencies that don’t implement IDependency to Orchard

    There are rare cases where you’ll want to be able to inject instances of classes that don’t implement IDependency. One example of this can be found in MvcModule in Orchard.Framework, which also provides a good example of how to do it. The idea is to derive from Module, and override the Load method to register factories for the types you want to expose:

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  • Making MiniProfiler work in the Orchard dashboard

    MiniProfiler is a wonderful module. It’s especially good at showing you the select n+1 problems in your Orchard applications. For some reason that is not entirely clear to me, however, it is only active on the front-end. If you have to debug a performance issue in the dashboard, you’re out of luck. Fortunately, the limitation is entirely arbitrary, easy to find, and easy to remove.

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  • A better way to play with HQL in Orchard

    In previous posts, I’ve shown how to query Orchard with straight HQL. However, I haven’t provided a good environment to run and debug these queries so far, because I didn’t have one. As a matter of facts, my method to build new queries has consisted in building queries from the projection module, putting a breakpoint at the end of the “DefaultHqlQuery.ToHql” method, and previewing the query in order to steal the query string built by the projection module. To debug, I’ve put the code in custom controller actions, and debugged the exceptions from VS. Not super-convenient.

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  • Querying Orchard fields with HQL

    Before projections, the official word on fields was that they weren’t for querying (they are stored in an XML blob on the content item record). Projections enabled field querying for the first time, through special tables that index field contents: Orchard_Projections_DecimalFieldIndexRecord, Orchard_Projections_DoubleFieldIndexRecord, Orchard_Projections_IntegerFieldIndexRecord, and Orchard_Projections_StringFieldIndexRecord. Each table is specialized for one underlying value type.An indexing table has columns for property names and values

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