Getting WCF Bindings and Behaviors from any config source

The need of loading WCF bindings or behaviors from different sources such as files in a disk or databases is a common requirement when dealing with configuration either on the client side or the service side.

The traditional way to accomplish this in WCF is loading everything from the standard configuration section (serviceModel section) or creating all the bindings and behaviors by hand in code. However, there is a solution in the middle that becomes handy when more flexibility is needed. This solution involves getting the configuration from any place, and use that configuration to automatically configure any existing binding or behavior instance created with code. 

In order to configure a binding instance (System.ServiceModel.Channels.Binding) that you later inject in any endpoint on the client channel or the service host, you first need to get a binding configuration section from any configuration file (you can generate a temp file on the fly if you are using any other source for storing the configuration).

 

private BindingsSection GetBindingsSection(string path)
{
  System.Configuration.Configuration config = 
System.Configuration.ConfigurationManager.OpenMappedExeConfiguration(
    new System.Configuration.ExeConfigurationFileMap() { ExeConfigFilename = path },
      System.Configuration.ConfigurationUserLevel.None);

  var serviceModel = ServiceModelSectionGroup.GetSectionGroup(config);
  return serviceModel.Bindings;
}

 

The BindingsSection contains a list of all the configured bindings in the serviceModel configuration section, so you can iterate through all the configured binding that get the one you need (You don’t need to have a complete serviceModel section, a section with the bindings only works).

 

public Binding ResolveBinding(string name)
{
  BindingsSection section = GetBindingsSection(path);

  foreach (var bindingCollection in section.BindingCollections)
  {
    if (bindingCollection.ConfiguredBindings.Count > 0 
&& bindingCollection.ConfiguredBindings[0].Name == name)
    {
      var bindingElement = bindingCollection.ConfiguredBindings[0];
      var binding = (Binding)Activator.CreateInstance(bindingCollection.BindingType);
      binding.Name = bindingElement.Name;
      bindingElement.ApplyConfiguration(binding);

      return binding;
    }
  }

  return null;
}

 

The code above does just that, and also instantiates and configures the Binding object (System.ServiceModel.Channels.Binding) you are looking for. As you can see, the binding configuration element contains a method “ApplyConfiguration” that receives the binding instance that needs to be configured.

A similar thing can be done for instance with the “Endpoint” behaviors. You first get the BehaviorsSection, and then, the behavior you want to use.

 

private BehaviorsSection GetBehaviorsSection(string path)
{
  System.Configuration.Configuration config = 
System.Configuration.ConfigurationManager.OpenMappedExeConfiguration(
       new System.Configuration.ExeConfigurationFileMap() { ExeConfigFilename = path },
          System.Configuration.ConfigurationUserLevel.None);

  var serviceModel = ServiceModelSectionGroup.GetSectionGroup(config);
  return serviceModel.Behaviors;

}
public List<IEndpointBehavior> ResolveEndpointBehavior(string name)
{
  BehaviorsSection section = GetBehaviorsSection(path);
  List<IEndpointBehavior> endpointBehaviors = new List<IEndpointBehavior>();

  if (section.EndpointBehaviors.Count > 0 
&& section.EndpointBehaviors[0].Name == name)
  {
    var behaviorCollectionElement = section.EndpointBehaviors[0];

    foreach (BehaviorExtensionElement behaviorExtension in behaviorCollectionElement)
    {
      object extension = behaviorExtension.GetType().InvokeMember("CreateBehavior",
            BindingFlags.InvokeMethod | BindingFlags.NonPublic | BindingFlags.Instance,
            null, behaviorExtension, null);

      endpointBehaviors.Add((IEndpointBehavior)extension);
    }

   return endpointBehaviors;
 }

 return null;
}

 

In this case, the code for creating the behavior instance is more tricky. First of all, a behavior in the configuration section actually represents a set of “IEndpoint” behaviors, and the behavior element you get from the configuration does not have any public method to configure an existing behavior instance. This last one only contains a protected method “CreateBehavior” that you can use for that purpose.

Once you get this code implemented, a client channel can be easily configured as follows

 

var binding = resolver.ResolveBinding("MyBinding");
var behaviors = resolver.ResolveEndpointBehavior("MyBehavior");

SampleServiceClient client = new SampleServiceClient(binding, 
       new EndpointAddress(new Uri("http://localhost:13749/SampleService.svc"),
       new DnsEndpointIdentity("localhost")));
            
foreach (var behavior in behaviors)
{
   if(client.Endpoint.Behaviors.Contains(behavior.GetType()))
   {
     client.Endpoint.Behaviors.Remove(behavior.GetType());
   }
   client.Endpoint.Behaviors.Add(behavior);
}

 

The code above assumes that a configuration file (in any place) with a binding “MyBinding” and a behavior “MyBehavior” exists. That file can look like this,

 

<system.serviceModel>
   <bindings>
     <basicHttpBinding>
       <binding name="MyBinding">
         <security mode="Transport"></security>
       </binding>
     </basicHttpBinding>
   </bindings>
   <behaviors>
     <endpointBehaviors>
       <behavior name="MyBehavior">
         <clientCredentials>
           <windows/>
         </clientCredentials>
       </behavior>
     </endpointBehaviors>
   </behaviors>
 </system.serviceModel>

 

The same thing can be done of course in the service host if you want to manually configure the bindings and behaviors.

 

Published Tuesday, May 11, 2010 11:15 AM by cibrax
Filed under: ,

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