July 2007 - Posts

ASP.NET Podcasts
Friday, July 20, 2007 2:57 PM

After going on holidays, feeling relaxed and generally not doing much tech related stuff, I have fallen behind in a number of things. One was my inbox, something like 1400+ messages I have had to wade through, and they keep coming.

However, the other is the podcasts. Wally has been producing some podcasts and I have been out of the loop, and being the slacker that I am, have not listed them here on my blog. So without further ado, here's the recent list:

( As usual, Subscribe here )

ASP.NET Podcast Show #97 - Jim Wooley on Link Part III (video and audio)

Original URL: http://aspnetpodcast.com/CS11/blogs/asp.net_podcast/archive/2007/07/12/asp-net-podcast-show-97-jim-wooley-on-link-part-iii-video-and-audio.aspx

Download WMV File, MP4 File (iPod and Zune), MP3 Audio File.

Show Notes:

In the past, working with data has required learning a number of different API sets for each kind of data you needed to access. Relational data requires ADO. XML uses Xpath, XQuery and the XML Dom. Objects require you to write your own manipulation code. In this video, Jim Wooley (MVP in VB) continues to look at the Language Integrated Query (LINQ) project and demonstrates how to leverage it to use a single API to work against XML, objects and relational data. In it, we continue exploring the ThinqLinq web site by demonstrating creating and querying XML to create and consume RSS feeds using ASP.Net with Visual Studio code name "Orcas". The video concludes with an overview of the language changes in C#3.0 and VB 9.0 which enable the querying functionality.
This video is part 3 of 3. The code samples and slides are available at http://devauthority.com/files/13/jwooley/entry38500.aspx. Jim can be contacted via his web site at http://devauthority.com/blogs/jwooley or at the site for his upcoming LINQ book at http://LinqInAction.net.

 

ASP.NET Podcast Show #96 - Jim Wooley on Link Part II (video and audio)

Direct Download format:  WMV File, Ipod/Zune, MP3 audio File

Show Notes:

In the past, working with data has required learning a number of different API sets for each kind of data you needed to access. Relational data requires ADO. XML uses Xpath, XQuery and the XML Dom. Objects require you to write your own manipulation code. In this video, Jim Wooley (MVP in VB) continues to look at the Language Integrated Query (LINQ) project and demonstrates how to leverage it to use a single API to work against objects or relational data. In it, we continue exploring the ThinqLinq
<http://aspnetpodcast.com/CS11/blogs/asp.net_podcast/archive/2007/07/09/asp-net-podcast-show-96-jim-wooley-on-link-part-ii-video-and-audio.aspx> web site by demonstrating joining in-memory object structures from System.IO with relational data from SQL Server. We also look at updating data back to the database using ASP.Net with Visual Studio code name "Orcas".
This video is part 2 of 3. The code samples and slides are available at http://devauthority.com/files/13/jwooley/entry38500.aspx. Jim can be contacted via his web site at http://devauthority.com/blogs/jwooley or at the site for his upcoming LINQ book at http://LinqInAction.net

 

ASP.NET Podcast Show #95 - Jim Wooley on LINQ Part I (video and audio)

Original url: http://aspnetpodcast.com/CS11/blogs/asp.net_podcast/archive/2007/06/28/asp-net-podcast-show-95-jim-wooley-on-linq-part-i-video-and-audio.aspx

Download WMV video, iPod video, MP3 audio.

Show Notes:

Part 1:
In the past, working with data has required learning a number of different API sets for each kind of data you needed to access. Relational data requires ADO. XML uses Xpath, XQuery and the XML Dom. Objects require you to write your own manipulation code. In this video, Jim Wooley (MVP in VB) introduces the Language Integrated Query (LINQ) project and demonstrates how to leverage it to use a single API to work against objects or relational data. In it, we explore extending an existing web site to add the ability to load a set of web links from a database and display them using ASP.Net with Visual Studio code name "Orcas". He starts with a standard object collection populated by a DataReader and demonstrates how to eliminate the plumbing code using LINQ and LINQ to SQL.

Originally recorded on 3/21. Link to the Beta 1 download page: http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/vstudio/aa700831.aspx
This video is part 1 of 3 recorded at the Atlanta Visual Basic Study Group (www.avbsg.net). If it stops abruptly, it is because we didn't realize pressing F10 to step through code in a VPC would cause our recording tool to stop. The code samples and slides are available at http://devauthority.com/files/13/jwooley/entry38500.aspx. Jim can be contacted via his web site at http://devauthority.com/blogs/jwooley or at the site for his upcoming LINQ book at http://LinqInAction.net

XBox 360 120Gb Hard Disk
Thursday, July 19, 2007 11:46 PM

So I got me a 120Gb hard disk for my XBox 360 for my birthday a few days ago. Its pretty sweet and came with a transfer cable and software to migrate all my stuff from the 20Gb unit to my 120Gb unit. It feels quite a bit faster too. The demo's I have all seem to load a lot faster.

Nice. Now I can download to my hearts content and not have to continually clean up the drive.

I thoroughly recommend the unit.

I also got a new game called Overlord. Awesome fun. I get to command a horde of evil minions to do my bidding. Its a blast.

by Glav | 16 comment(s)
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Beginning ASP.NET 2.0 AJAX Book is out!
Friday, July 13, 2007 1:12 PM

The past year or so I have been working with a number of excellent co-authors on another book called Beginning ASP.NET 2.0 AJAX and as you can imagine, is solely devoted to the topic of the Microsoft ASP.NET 2.0 AJAX Extensions.

Well its out and you can go and grab yourself a copy. You probably want at least 2, perhaps 3 or 4. If you can tear yourself away from looking at the stunningly handsome authors on the front cover, you will be graced by the excellent technical coverage of all things related to the ASP.NET AJAX Extensions.

The Amazon link to the book is here or you can find out more about the book from Wiley's site here.

An excerpt from Wiley's site about the book:

  • Written by a high-power team of Microsoft MVP's, this book provides a comprehensive introduction to the ASP.NET AJAX features
  • After a quick overview of the architecture and features of ASP.NET 2.0 AJAX, coverage then goes on to show developers how to build richer, more responsive dynamic Web sites and Web applications
  • Dives into such topics as ASP.NET 2.0 AJAX user interface design issues, JavaScript enhancements with AJAX, how to use the UpdatePanel for implementing server-side controls, and XML scripting in AJAX
  • Also offers an outline of the ASP.NET 2.0 AJAXControl Toolkit, and discusses implementing drag and drop functions, databinding, debugging and security, ASP.NET services, and bridging and gadgets
  • The companion Web site provides readers with a rich set of code examples

I think fellow co-author Steve Smith did an excellent job of promoting the book by his completely unbiased and absolutely 100% true (would I lie to you? ) comparison to the release of the iPhone.

Seriously though, go grab it. I am quite proud of it and think it has a huge amount of great content.

iMate Jasjar - 1 year later
Wednesday, July 11, 2007 3:20 PM

I own an iMate Jasjar phone and have done for about 1 year. I recently returned from a snow holiday in the lovely snowy mountains here in New South Wales, Australia.

I took my phone along and given that I had some issues with it, thought I would give my feelings on the phone after an approximate year of usage. Normally you read reviews of the phone based on its paper specifications and after only a short time of using it. Well, here is the other end of that.

Its not going to be too long, don't worry.

So, the good stuff:

  • It has a great set of features.
    3G is one of my favorites. I use it all the time. Bluetooth works well, expandability is great, camera works well, swivel screen is good.
  • The Keyboard.
    The keyboard is good because its bigger than most. It lights up automatically in dark environments. However, I thought I would use it a lot, but its actually a lot less than anticipated. Its not real good for one hand use.
  • Screen Size
    Good size, clear, 640 x 480 resolution.
  • Swivel screen.
    You can flip the screen in landscape or portrait mode easily. Nice.

The bad stuff:

  • As a phone, its extremely poor
    If you want a phone, don't buy this unit. It "can" act as a phone, but its really bad, bordering on the extremely frustrating to use to the extent I want to throw it. When I was down the snow, people were happily using their mobile phones to make and receive calls. Not me. Phone function was useless. Now some might say, yes but what carrier were you with. Vodafone is the carrier, which can be attributed to some of it, however my wife's phone is also with Vodafone and it worked fine. Its a $200 Sony-Ericsson toy in comparison, but at least it worked and we relied on that while down there. Its an important point. We *relied* on that far cheaper phone to make calls in a relatively remote location. My $1500+ all singing and dancing  unit simply could not pull it off.
  • Slow, Slow, Slow.
    Its as slow as a wet week. Its got a 500Mhz proc, and feels slower than all phones I have used to date. A lot of the time, I want to dial my voicemail which is 121. I press the numbers 121, and 4 seconds later, the display reads 112 or something stupid, getting the numbers out of order, and taking ages to display. Really poor. App performance is quite slow too.
  • Big and Heavy.
    Its big and lugging it around requires big pockets. Pretty solid though.
  • One handed usage
    Forget it. Its a 2 handed beast. You might be able to get away with some stuff, but not much, and not without hand gymnastics.
  • Flip closed usage
    I answer calls with the flip closed generally. It has 2 buttons on the side which answer or hangup calls. These buttons feel unresponsive, sometimes they are either slow to activate (meaning you press the answer button multiple times, causing all weirdness with the call), sometimes you just don't hangup, meaning you better be careful what you say after you hang up, else you could get into some trouble.....
  • Usability
    Poor. This is mostly because of Windows Mobile. Look at Nokia and Sony Ericsson (and perhaps iPhone). Those phones are designed to be phones and used like them. Direct and simple for the functions its intended for (in general). Windows Mobile phones try and shrink a desktop onto a phone. Sorry, doesn't work well.

Conclusion:

  • Would I buy it again?
    Nope. Too slow and unreliable. Core functions, like making and receiving calls are an afterthought.
  • Would I recommend it?
    Only to a small percentage of people based on their requirements of course, but for general usage, nope.
  • So would I consider it a good unit?
    Functionally impressive, some great features. Execution leaves a lot to be desired. Lots of promise, little in the way of delivery and implementation.
by Glav | 14 comment(s)
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