Contents tagged with ASP.NET

  • SignalR is Magic

    Recently, I attended a Twin Cities .NET User Group presentation on SignalR.  I had heard about SignalR several times and was curious.   Plus there was free pizza…<burp>.

    SignalR has revamped the way I think about web sites.   Normally, a browser requests some data and the server sends it.  Ajax allows discreet calls to avoid full post-backs and full page rendering…but it is still a “request and wait” protocol.  A web client can also poll a web server which allows the server to choose when and what to send to the clients.  But that is a kind of ‘duct-tape’ programming.   It is interesting to note that internally SignalR will fall back to polling protocols if a more modern transport isn’t supported by the browser.

    In a nutshell:  SignalR allows the server to actively push data to clients.  

    I decide to try writing my own SignalR Application:  A Live Golf Scoring system.    Here is a link to a live demo of the final application:

    Here is what the final product looks like, note there are three browsers, IE, Chrome and FF all showing the exact same data: 

  • Log4net: Log to a JavaScript Console

    While lurking and skulking in the shadows of various technical .Net sites, I've noticed many developers discussing log4net in their blogs and posts; log4net is an extremely popular tool for logging .Net Applications. So, I decided to try it out. After the initial complexities of getting it up and running, I was suitably impressed. Could it be…logging is fun? Well, I don't know if I'd go that far…at least I'd never admit it.

  • HTML 5 and jQuery – A Match Made in Heaven

    I recently attended an ASP.NET MVC seminar hosted by the Twin Cities .Net User Group. The speaker was K. Scott Allen. Scott is a charismatic, gifted speaker and did a great job. You can always pick up useful items when watching an expert write a program from scratch.

  • jQuery Selector Tester and Cheat Sheet

    I've always appreciated these tools: Expresso and XPath Builder. They make designing regular expressions and XPath selectors almost fun! Did I say fun? I meant less painful. Being able to paste/load text and then interactively play with the search criteria is infinitely better than the code/compile/run/test cycle. It's faster and you get a much better feel for how the expressions work.

  • Create Image Maps with GIMP

    Having a clickable image in a web page is not a big deal. Having an image in a web page with clickable hotspots is a big deal. The powerful GIMP editor has a tool to make creating clickable hotspots much easier.

  • Web.Config is Cached

    There was a question from a student over on the Asp.Net forums about improving site performance. The concern was that every time an app setting was read from the Web.Config file, the disk would be accessed. With many app settings and many users, it was believed performance would suffer.

  • Goodbye Ajax Toolkit, Hello jQuery UI

    Like most developers, I love finding tools that do my work for me and make me look good. And, like most developers, I am extremely wary of adding too much outside crap to a project which can make maintaining it a nightmare. You may end up not only maintaining your own code but someone else's code, or worse, not being able to update the project because a third-party control won't let you.