Follow me on Twitter at Twitter.com/wbm
FYI, I'm blogging most of my stuff over at More Wally now.
You might want to add my rss feed to your reader at:http://morewally.com/cs/blogs/wallym/rss.aspx
Mainsoft's Grasshopper Gives Visual Studio Developers a jump on writing Linux Apps - Wallace B. McClure

Wallace B. McClure

All About Wally McClure - The musings of Wallym on Web, HTML5, Mobile, Xamarin.iOS, Xamarin.Android, and Windows Azure.

News

Visual Studio Magazine Column Personal Blog

.NET

Book Authors

Business

Family

Friends

Georgia Tech Bloggers

Personal

Archives

Mainsoft's Grasshopper Gives Visual Studio Developers a jump on writing Linux Apps

http://www.eweek.com/article2/0,1759,1819419,00.asp

Mainsoft Corp. Tuesday announced a program and a new tool for Visual Studio .Net developers to use their familiar tool set to write applications for Linux.

The San Jose, Calif., company announced its Visual Studio .Net for Linux Developer Program as well as its new Visual MainWin for J2EE (Java 2 Enterprise Edition) Developer Edition tool, code-named Grasshopper.

From the article, It looks like there will be two versions.  The free version works with Apache/Tomcat.  The for-pay version works with several J2EE platforms.

Wally

Comments

Jon Galloway said:

Seems like a weird concept.

Instead of running .NET applications directly on the Mono framework, they're converting Mono to Java and running the .NET apps as Java apps on Linux: "We use the Grasshopper binary compiler to compile the C# Mono sources to Java™ bytecode, and we provide the .NET Framework class library on top of the J2EE™ infrastructure."

Why not just run the .NET apps directly on Mono as designed (other than the fact that Mainsoft sells a product that converts .NET to Java)?
# May 24, 2005 1:46 PM

Laurence Moroney said:

>>Why not just run the .NET apps directly on Mono as designed (other than the fact that Mainsoft sells a product that converts .NET to Java)? <<

Lots of reasons.

1. Run-time characteristics of J2EE?
2. Leverage of investment in J2EE app servers?
3. Corporate Policies around using Mono and/or open source code?
4. Integration with systems management tools that are designed for J2EE app servers?

...and many more! :)

# May 26, 2005 11:15 AM

Roy Sheinfeld said:

In this way you can utilize all of java/j2ee services (libraries, application server infrastructures etc..). You can't overlook the advantages in using j2ee.

# May 26, 2005 12:36 PM

jshark said:

2 additional reasons:

1. JVM - you still cannot compare the performance, scalability and reliability of
Java Virtual Machines from different vendors
to the VM provided by Mono. The Mono VM has
a long way to go till it will be comparable
with leading JVM(s)

2. Real multi-platform solution. Mono can run
on several platforms in addition to Linux, however - there are still platforms which unsupported by Mono, and the quality of supported
platform still not ready for "real-world-production-environment", IMHO.
# June 19, 2005 2:21 AM