Tales from the Evil Empire

Bertrand Le Roy's blog

  • Orchard Harvest 2017–Orchard Core CMS

    For the last presentation of the day, Sébastien explained what Orchard Core is all about. Orchard Core runs on ASP.NET Core, and as a consequence is leaner, faster, and cross-platform. One big change is that its content is persisted as documents instead of relational tables.

  • Orchard Harvest 2017–YesSql

    Sébastien Ros gave a surprise demo of YesSql, the document database interface over relational databases that powers Orchard Core’s data access. YesSql stores plain objects into documents stored on a relational database. It supports SQL Server, MySql, Postgre, Sqlite, LightningDB, and in-memory. YesSql also allows for querying those objects using queryable indexes. Those indexes are projections of documents into structured tables, that only exist for the purpose of being queried.

  • Orchard Harvest 2017–Localization

    Benedek is one of the founders of Lombiq, and the caretaker of Orchard localization. Application localization requires taking into account cultural differences such as gender, formal vs informal, pluralization, right to left, verbosity, accents, etc. In Orchard, all localizable strings should be wrapped in T() calls. That is enough to make the string localizable in PO files. Some strings can contain placeholders, such as T("Hello, I’m from {0}."). You can use the Vandelay Industries module’s translation extraction feature to extract all the T strings from a module into po files. The module produces a zip archive that contains the layout of localization files that you’d unzip into the site in order to install it. To localize, you can copy any po file from its en-us directory to a new directory for the new culture, then translate the strings inside.

  • Orchard Harvest 2017–Writing a theme for Orchard Core

    In the first session of the second day of Orchard Harvest, Steve Taylor showed how to build a new theme for Orchard Core. All the pieces are already in place for building themed sites, and the work is similar to Orchard 1.x themes, except for some json file editing because of missing admin UI in places. New Razor Pages features can be used, such as tag helpers, @inject directives, etc. The tag helpers in particular, coupled with Orchard’s shapes, make for very clean markup in view files. The video for the talk, when available, will be a valuable reference for people who want to get started building sites with Orchard Core: the CMS now looks feature-complete enough to do some serious work. Widgets are there, the shape system is there, search, navigation, all work. That Steve was able to build a complete site and theme under an hour (with some pre-built css and views, of course) shows how far Orchard Core has gone already.

  • Orchard Harvest 2017–What’s new in ASP.NET MVC Core 2.0

    Taylor Mullen from the ASP.NET team is a developer working on MVC Core 2.0. In this session, he went over the design of the new Razor Pages feature. He carefully explained what is difficult with MVC currently, in order to justify the feature. He actually started by showing what it’s not: it’s not PHP-like, and it’s not a new take on previous “ASP.NET Pages” features.

  • Orchard Harvest 2017 – Using external data with Orchard

    Jorge Agraz is opening the conference after Sébastien Ros’ keynote with a talk about using external data in Orchard. Jorge work for Onestop, a company that builds e-commerce sites. Their web sites get their commerce data from APIs and then used to display that through their controllers with Orchard shapes. They attempted to use widgets instead of controllers, but that came with some significant maintenance problems.