Windows Azure: Major Updates for Mobile Backend Development

This week we released some great updates to Windows Azure that make it significantly easier to develop mobile applications that use the cloud. These new capabilities include:

  • Mobile Services: Custom API support
  • Mobile Services: Git Source Control support
  • Mobile Services: Node.js NPM Module support
  • Mobile Services: A .NET API via NuGet
  • Mobile Services and Web Sites: Free 20MB SQL Database Option for Mobile Services and Web Sites
  • Mobile Notification Hubs: Android Broadcast Push Notification Support

All of these improvements are now available to use immediately (note: some are still in preview).  Below are more details about them.

Mobile Services: Custom APIs, Git Source Control, and NuGet

Windows Azure Mobile Services provides the ability to easily stand up a mobile backend that can be used to support your Windows 8, Windows Phone, iOS, Android and HTML5 client applications.  Starting with the first preview we supported the ability to easily extend your data backend logic with server side scripting that executes as part of client-side CRUD operations against your cloud back data tables.

With today’s update we are extending this support even further and introducing the ability for you to also create and expose Custom APIs from your Mobile Service backend, and easily publish them to your Mobile clients without having to associate them with a data table. This capability enables a whole set of new scenarios – including the ability to work with data sources other than SQL Databases (for example: Table Services or MongoDB), broker calls to 3rd party APIs, integrate with Windows Azure Queues or Service Bus, work with custom non-JSON payloads (e.g. Windows Periodic Notifications), route client requests to services back on-premises (e.g. with the new Windows Azure BizTalk Services), or simply implement functionality that doesn’t correspond to a database operation.  The custom APIs can be written in server-side JavaScript (using Node.js) and can use Node’s NPM packages.  We will also be adding support for custom APIs written using .NET in the future as well.

Creating a Custom API

Adding a custom API to an existing Mobile Service is super easy.  Using the Windows Azure Management Portal you can now simply click the new “API” tab with your Mobile Service, and then click the “Create a Custom API” button to create a new Custom API within it:

image

Give the API whatever name you want to expose, and then choose the security permissions you’d like to apply to the HTTP methods you expose within it.  You can easily lock down the HTTP verbs to your Custom API to be available to anyone, only those who have a valid application key, only authenticated users, or administrators.  Mobile Services will then enforce these permissions without you having to write any code:

image

When you click the ok button you’ll see the new API show up in the API list.  Selecting it will enable you to edit the default script that contains some placeholder functionality:

image

Today’s release enables Custom APIs to be written using Node.js (we will support writing Custom APIs in .NET as well in a future release), and the Custom API programming model follows the Node.js convention for modules, which is to export functions to handle HTTP requests.

The default script above exposes functionality for an HTTP POST request. To support a GET, simply change the export statement accordingly.  Below is an example of some code for reading and returning data from Windows Azure Table Storage using the Azure Node API:

image

After saving the changes, you can now call this API from any Mobile Service client application (including Windows 8, Windows Phone, iOS, Android or HTML5 with CORS).

Below is the code for how you could invoke the API asynchronously from a Windows Store application using .NET and the new InvokeApiAsync method, and data-bind the results to control within your XAML:

    private async void RefreshTodoItems() {

        var results = await App.MobileService.InvokeApiAsync<List<TodoItem>>("todos", HttpMethod.Get, parameters: null);

        ListItems.ItemsSource = new ObservableCollection<TodoItem>(results);

    }   

Integrating authentication and authorization with Custom APIs is really easy with Mobile Services. Just like with data requests, custom API requests enjoy the same built-in authentication and authorization support of Mobile Services (including integration with Microsoft ID, Google, Facebook and Twitter authentication providers), and it also enables you to easily integrate your Custom API code with other Mobile Service capabilities like push notifications, logging, SQL, etc.

Check out our new tutorials to learn more about to use new Custom API support, and starting adding them to your app today.

Mobile Services: Git Source Control Support

Today’s Mobile Services update also enables source control integration with Git.  The new source control support provides a Git repository as part your Mobile Service, and it includes all of your existing Mobile Service scripts and permissions. You can clone that git repository on your local machine, make changes to any of your scripts, and then easily deploy the mobile service to production using Git. This enables a really great developer workflow that works on any developer machine (Windows, Mac and Linux).

To use the new support, navigate to the dashboard for your mobile service and select the Set up source control link:

image

If this is your first time enabling Git within Windows Azure, you will be prompted to enter the credentials you want to use to access the repository:

image

Once you configure this, you can switch to the configure tab of your Mobile Service and you will see a Git URL you can use to use your repository:

image

You can use this URL to clone the repository locally from your favorite command line:

> git clone https://scottgutodo.scm.azure-mobile.net/ScottGuToDo.git

image

Below is the directory structure of the repository:

image

As you can see, the repository contains a service folder with several subfolders. Custom API scripts and associated permissions appear under the api folder as .js and .json files respectively (the .json files persist a JSON representation of the security settings for your endpoints). Similarly, table scripts and table permissions appear as .js and .json files, but since table scripts are separate per CRUD operation, they follow the naming convention of <tablename>.<operationname>.js. Finally, scheduled job scripts appear in the scheduler folder, and the shared folder is provided as a convenient location for you to store code shared by multiple scripts and a few miscellaneous things such as the APNS feedback script.

Lets modify the table script todos.js file so that we have slightly better error handling when an exception occurs when we query our Table service:

todos.js

tableService.queryEntities(query, function(error, todoItems){
    if (error) {
        console.error("Error querying table: " + error);
        response.send(500);
    } else {
        response.send(200, todoItems);
    }       
});

Save these changes, and now back in the command line prompt commit the changes and push them to the Mobile Services:

> git add .

> git commit –m "better error handling in todos.js"

> git push

image

Once deployment of the changes is complete, they will take effect immediately, and you will also see the changes be reflected in the portal:

image

With the new Source Control feature, we’re making it really easy for you to edit your mobile service locally and push changes in an atomic fashion without sacrificing ease of use in the Windows Azure Portal.

Mobile Services: NPM Module Support

The new Mobile Services source control support also allows you to add any Node.js module you need in the scripts beyond the fixed set provided by Mobile Services. For example, you can easily switch to use Mongo instead of Windows Azure table in our example above. Set up Mongo DB by either purchasing a MongoLab subscription (which provides MongoDB as a Service) via the Windows Azure Store or set it up yourself on a Virtual Machine (either Windows or Linux). Then go the service folder of your local git repository and run the following command:

> npm install mongoose

This will add the Mongoose module to your Mobile Service scripts.  After that you can use and reference the Mongoose module in your custom API scripts to access your Mongo database:

var mongoose = require('mongoose');

var schema = mongoose.Schema({ text: String, completed: Boolean });

 

exports.get = function (request, response) {

    mongoose.connect('<your Mongo connection string> ');

    TodoItemModel = mongoose.model('todoitem', schema);

    TodoItemModel.find(function (err, items) {

        if (err) {

            console.log('error:' + err);

            return response.send(500);

        }

        response.send(200, items);

    });

};

Don’t forget to push your changes to your mobile service once you are done

> git add .

> git commit –m "Switched to use Mongo Labs"

> git push

Now our Mobile Service app is using Mongo DB!

Note, with today’s update usage of custom Node.js modules is limited to Custom API scripts only. We will enable it in all scripts (including data and custom CRON tasks) shortly.

New Mobile Services NuGet package, including .NET 4.5 support

A few months ago we announced a new pre-release version of the Mobile Services client SDK based on portable class libraries (PCL).

Today, we are excited to announce that this new library is now a stable .NET client SDK for mobile services and is no longer a pre-release package. Today’s update includes full support for Windows Store, Windows Phone 7.x, and .NET 4.5, which allows developers to use Mobile Services from ASP.NET or WPF applications.

You can install and use this package today via NuGet.

Mobile Services and Web Sites: Free 20MB Database for Mobile Services and Web Sites

Starting today, every customer of Windows Azure gets one Free 20MB database to use for 12 months free (for both dev/test and production) with Web Sites and Mobile Services.

When creating a Mobile Service or a Web Site, simply chose the new “Create a new Free 20MB database” option to take advantage of it:

image

You can use this free SQL Database together with the 10 free Web Sites and 10 free Mobile Services you get with your Windows Azure subscription, or from any other Windows Azure VM or Cloud Service.

Notification Hubs: Android Broadcast Push Notification Support

Earlier this year, we introduced a new capability in Windows Azure for sending broadcast push notifications at high scale: Notification Hubs.

In the initial preview of Notification Hubs you could use this support with both iOS and Windows devices.  Today we’re excited to announce new Notification Hubs support for sending push notifications to Android devices as well.

Push notifications are a vital component of mobile applications.  They are critical not only in consumer apps, where they are used to increase app engagement and usage, but also in enterprise apps where up-to-date information increases employee responsiveness to business events.  You can use Notification Hubs to send push notifications to devices from any type of app (a Mobile Service, Web Site, Cloud Service or Virtual Machine).

Notification Hubs provide you with the following capabilities:

  • Cross-platform Push Notifications Support. Notification Hubs provide a common API to send push notifications to iOS, Android, or Windows Store at once.  Your app can send notifications in platform specific formats or in a platform-independent way. 
  • Efficient Multicast. Notification Hubs are optimized to enable push notification broadcast to thousands or millions of devices with low latency.  Your server back-end can fire one message into a Notification Hub, and millions of push notifications can automatically be delivered to your users.  Devices and apps can specify a number of per-user tags when registering with a Notification Hub. These tags do not need to be pre-provisioned or disposed, and provide a very easy way to send filtered notifications to an infinite number of users/devices with a single API call.  
  • Extreme Scale. Notification Hubs enable you to reach millions of devices without you having to re-architect or shard your application.  The pub/sub routing mechanism allows you to broadcast notifications in a super-efficient way.  This makes it incredibly easy to route and deliver notification messages to millions of users without having to build your own routing infrastructure.
  • Usable from any Backend App. Notification Hubs can be easily integrated into any back-end server app, whether it is a Mobile Service, a Web Site, a Cloud Service or an IAAS VM.

It is easy to configure Notification Hubs to send push notifications to Android. Create a new Notification Hub within the Windows Azure Management Portal (New->App Services->Service Bus->Notification Hub):

image

Then register for Google Cloud Messaging using https://code.google.com/apis/console and obtain your API key, then simply paste that key on the Configure tab of your Notification Hub management page under the Google Cloud Messaging Settings:

image

Then just add code to the OnCreate method of your Android app’s MainActivity class to register the device with Notification Hubs:

gcm = GoogleCloudMessaging.getInstance(this);

String connectionString = "<your listen access connection string>";

hub = new NotificationHub("<your notification hub name>", connectionString, this);

String regid = gcm.register(SENDER_ID);

hub.register(regid, "myTag");

Now you can broadcast notification from your .NET backend (or Node, Java, or PHP) to any Windows Store, Android, or iOS device registered for “myTag” tag via a single API call (you can literally broadcast messages to millions of clients you have registered with just one API call):

var hubClient = NotificationHubClient.CreateClientFromConnectionString(
                  “<your connection string with full access>”,
                  "<your notification hub name>");

hubClient.SendGcmNativeNotification("{ 'data' : {'msg' : 'Hello from Windows Azure!' } }", "myTag”);

Notification Hubs provide an extremely scalable, cross-platform, push notification infrastructure that enables you to efficiently route push notification messages to millions of mobile users and devices.  It will make enabling your push notification logic significantly simpler and more scalable, and allow you to build even better apps with it.

Learn more about Notification Hubs here on MSDN .

Summary

The above features are now live and available to start using immediately (note: some of the services are still in preview).  If you don’t already have a Windows Azure account, you can sign-up for a free trial and start using them today.  Visit the Windows Azure Developer Center to learn more about how to build apps with it.

Hope this helps,

Scott

P.S. In addition to blogging, I am also now using Twitter for quick updates and to share links. Follow me at: twitter.com/scottgu

Published Friday, June 14, 2013 2:32 AM by ScottGu
Filed under: , ,

Comments

# re: Windows Azure: Major Updates for Mobile Backend Development

Friday, June 14, 2013 5:45 AM by Jérémie Devillard

It's a huge update. Thanks a lot! This will open a tons of new scenario and facility to develop mobile services.

:)

# re: Windows Azure: Major Updates for Mobile Backend Development

Friday, June 14, 2013 6:39 AM by Mahesh

What does this means for ASP.Net Web API? Is that now not a preferred way to build HTTP services?

# re: Windows Azure: Major Updates for Mobile Backend Development

Friday, June 14, 2013 7:31 AM by Oliver Weichhold

Awesome news as usual.

ScottGut for CEO!

# re: Windows Azure: Major Updates for Mobile Backend Development

Friday, June 14, 2013 7:47 AM by RichB

So, why is it called MOBILE services if it's a REST service with optional SQL table storage callable from any client - including ASP.Net?

Second question, why isn't the JSON REST response gzip compressed?

Finally, I see you are using Monaco to edit the JavaScript. As Monaco is written in TypeScript, does that mean we should expect TypeScript support for these scripts?

# re: Windows Azure: Major Updates for Mobile Backend Development

Friday, June 14, 2013 8:15 AM by Gluwer

Is Git source control support planned also for existing Mobile Services? If I create new service it is there, but in for older ones there is no link in First Glance in Dashboard.

BTW. Great thanks for this 20MB MSSQL database. Any words about the limits except size and one yer availability? For example number of connections etc.

# re: Windows Azure: Major Updates for Mobile Backend Development

Friday, June 14, 2013 9:34 AM by Martin Suchan

These are nice improvements, but still the necessity to use/know node.js for anything nontrivial is a showstopper for me.

I'm rather studying the basics of Entity Framework and Nancy FX right now for creating the server side for my apps and it's quite easy, almost as easy as I wanted the Azure Mobile Services to be.

# re: Windows Azure: Major Updates for Mobile Backend Development

Friday, June 14, 2013 10:21 AM by Scott Cate

Amazing updates, thank you. Man these are coming out fast!

# re: Windows Azure: Major Updates for Mobile Backend Development

Friday, June 14, 2013 10:59 AM by Me

"We will also be adding support for custom APIs written using .NET in the future as well."

Why isn't .net supported right away? First silverlight dies, then windows RT, and now node.js over .net?

I can't start to express how much I hate programming in javascript (compared to C#).

# re: Windows Azure: Major Updates for Mobile Backend Development

Friday, June 14, 2013 11:35 AM by ScottGu

@Mahesh,

>>>>> What does this means for ASP.Net Web API? Is that now not a preferred way to build HTTP services?

The extensibility approach we'll enable for custom Mobile Service .NET based APIs will be ASP.NET Web API based - so not to worry.

Hope this helps,

Scott

# re: Windows Azure: Major Updates for Mobile Backend Development

Friday, June 14, 2013 11:38 AM by ScottGu

@RichB,

>>>>> So, why is it called MOBILE services if it's a REST service with optional SQL table storage callable from any client - including ASP.Net?

The primary scenario we see people using Mobile Services is to build back-ends for mobile client apps.

>>>>> Second question, why isn't the JSON REST response gzip compressed?

Good question - checking now.  I know the team is planning to enable it, will check to see if it with today's update.

>>>>> Finally, I see you are using Monaco to edit the JavaScript. As Monaco is written in TypeScript, does that mean we should expect TypeScript support for these scripts?

We will likely support that in the future.

Hope this helps,

Scott

# re: Windows Azure: Major Updates for Mobile Backend Development

Friday, June 14, 2013 11:38 AM by ScottGu

@Gluwer,

>>>>> Is Git source control support planned also for existing Mobile Services? If I create new service it is there, but in for older ones there is no link in First Glance in Dashboard.

Checking on this now

>>>>> BTW. Great thanks for this 20MB MSSQL database. Any words about the limits except size and one yer availability? For example number of connections etc.

This is a standard Windows Azure SQL Database (other than the size) so no limits on number of connections.

Hope this helps,

Scott

# re: Windows Azure: Major Updates for Mobile Backend Development

Friday, June 14, 2013 11:40 AM by ScottGu

@Martin,

>>>>>> These are nice improvements, but still the necessity to use/know node.js for anything nontrivial is a showstopper for me.  I'm rather studying the basics of Entity Framework and Nancy FX right now for creating the server side for my apps and it's quite easy, almost as easy as I wanted the Azure Mobile Services to be.

You can definitely create great mobile backends with ASP.NET Web API (and then deploy them to Windows Azure Web Sites today - we'll support hosting them in Mobile Services in the future as well).  Nancy FX also works with Windows Azure Web Sites.

Hope this helps,

Scott

# re: Windows Azure: Major Updates for Mobile Backend Development

Friday, June 14, 2013 1:10 PM by Kirill Gavrylyuk

@Gluwer,

Source controls is available to all mobile services. Sometime you may get 3-5 sec delay before the link appears on the dashboard. If that's not the case for you, could you follow up on the forums social.msdn.microsoft.com/.../threads with us / provide us your service name? We'll investigate.  

# re: Windows Azure: Major Updates for Mobile Backend Development

Friday, June 14, 2013 1:23 PM by Stephen Schaff

Any update on the "Pooling" of MSDN Subscriptions Developer Resources for a company?   I very much so want to use the Azure VM stuff, but my company will not allow even dev servers to be directly controlled by the Developers.  (To explain why, think about this scenario:  I create a server for a new project and when I am done, I move on and take my MSDN credits with me.  We still need that server working in our Development environment (all the SOA stuff works together).  However, with pooled resources we could allocate some of the entire pool to keep that server up and running.)

I guess the question about pooled resources comes down to what you are trying to accomplish with the free Dev/Test credits.  If you want more utilization of Azure then pooling is a good idea.  If you want more direct developer involvement in setting up Azure resources, then pooling is a bad idea. (Because it allows another party to manage the Azure setup stuff (like our IT Pros).

If we could pool the resources then we could setup our dev servers using Azure (and hopefully have some left over for devs to make extra servers as needed to test load balancing).

# re: Windows Azure: Major Updates for Mobile Backend Development

Friday, June 14, 2013 3:53 PM by Kirill Gavrylyuk

@RichB,

>>>>> Second question, why isn't the JSON REST response gzip compressed?

gzip compression is already supported on the server, we just haven't yet wired up decompression in our client SDKs / setting accept-encoding header. If you use Mobile Services REST API directly, you can switch to gzip already.

# re: Windows Azure: Major Updates for Mobile Backend Development

Friday, June 14, 2013 5:24 PM by Stephen Schaff

Any update on the "Pooling" of MSDN Subscriptions Developer Resources for a company?   I very much so want to use the Azure VM stuff, but my company will not allow even dev servers to be directly controlled by the Developers.  (To explain why, think about this scenario:  I create a server for a new project and when I am done, I move on and take my MSDN credits with me.  We still need that server working in our Development environment (all the SOA stuff works together).  However, with pooled resources we could allocate some of the entire pool to keep that server up and running.)

I guess the question about pooled resources comes down to what you are trying to accomplish with the free Dev/Test credits.  If you want more utilization of Azure then pooling is a good idea.  If you want more direct developer involvement in setting up Azure resources, then pooling is a bad idea. (Because it allows another party to manage the Azure setup stuff (like our IT Pros).

If we could pool the resources then we could setup our dev servers using Azure (and hopefully have some left over for devs to make extra servers as needed to test load balancing).

# re: Windows Azure: Major Updates for Mobile Backend Development

Friday, June 14, 2013 7:46 PM by Jay Borseth

Is CORS still going to happen for direct access of Table and Blob storage, or are we expected to be required to use Mobile Services APIs to utilize CORS?  

# re: Windows Azure: Major Updates for Mobile Backend Development

Saturday, June 15, 2013 5:36 AM by Vee Bee

Great updates Scott. When are you planning to launch payment gateway service that can be integrated with other azue offerings? Having this azure sercice as organic or through third party will make developers more happy. What do you say?

# re: Windows Azure: Major Updates for Mobile Backend Development

Saturday, June 15, 2013 6:36 AM by Ferdinand

Hi Scott,

first of all very cool update!

Im currently trying to do something that should be quite simple. In my custom API I want to join two tables of the mobile service. I was going to do that using the mssql object, but it seems that is not available?

Is there a workaround for what I'm trying to do?

Appreciate the help!

Ferdinand

# re: Windows Azure: Major Updates for Mobile Backend Development

Saturday, June 15, 2013 3:25 PM by peter williams

before this is all viable, the authentication providers just HAVE to be extended.

It MUST include

1. hooking up to the Federation Gateway in an Office365 tenant (that can federate back to ADFS, if configured)

2. Similarly hooking up to an Azure AD tenant (that similarly can federate back to ADFS)

# re: Windows Azure: Major Updates for Mobile Backend Development

Sunday, June 16, 2013 3:58 PM by Ruta B.

I came here excited about Notification HUB, but looking into it, I see no pricing information and it is still a beta product? When will it be ready for serious uses?

Thank you

# re: Windows Azure: Major Updates for Mobile Backend Development

Sunday, June 16, 2013 4:02 PM by Jon Boyer

So we can use push notifications to Android, but not to Line-Of-Business WinRT applications that aren't distributed through the store?

# re: Windows Azure: Major Updates for Mobile Backend Development

Monday, June 17, 2013 11:39 AM by Buddy

Has the pricing model for Notification Hub been established?

# re: Windows Azure: Major Updates for Mobile Backend Development

Monday, June 17, 2013 12:44 PM by miksh_iis

Scott, I wonder is the notification hub internals based on SignalR framework?

# re: Windows Azure: Major Updates for Mobile Backend Development

Tuesday, June 18, 2013 10:00 AM by ScottGu

@Gluwer,

>>>>> Is Git source control support planned also for existing Mobile Services? If I create new service it is there, but in for older ones there is no link in First Glance in Dashboard.

Not sure if you saw Kirill's response above - but it is supported for all mobile services (including previously created ones).  Sometime you may get a 3-5 sec delay before the link appears on the dashboard. If that's not the case for you, can you send me email (scottgu@microsoft.com) and we'll investigate?

Thanks,

Scott

# re: Windows Azure: Major Updates for Mobile Backend Development

Tuesday, June 18, 2013 10:03 AM by ScottGu

@Stephen,

>>>>> Any update on the "Pooling" of MSDN Subscriptions Developer Resources for a company?   I very much so want to use the Azure VM stuff, but my company will not allow even dev servers to be directly controlled by the Developers.  (To explain why, think about this scenario:  I create a server for a new project and when I am done, I move on and take my MSDN credits with me.  We still need that server working in our Development environment (all the SOA stuff works together).  However, with pooled resources we could allocate some of the entire pool to keep that server up and running.)

We don't have any updates on this right now - realistically I don't think we'll have an update for several months.  

I believe the person who purchases the MSDN benefit gets to assign the Microsoft ID's it is applied to.  So if a developer left the company the credits could be reassigned to another developer - they wouldn't just leave with the individual.

Feel free to send me email (scottgu@microsoft.com) and I can connect you with folks who can help walkthrough options here.

Hope this helps,

Scott

# re: Windows Azure: Major Updates for Mobile Backend Development

Tuesday, June 18, 2013 10:04 AM by ScottGu

@RichB,

>>>>> Second question, why isn't the JSON REST response gzip compressed?

The GZIP support is enabled on the server now with Mobile Services - the client SDKs still need updating though (although if you call the raw REST APIs directly it will work).  We'll be updated the client SDKs in the next 2-3 weeks to include this by default.

Hope this helps,

Scott

# re: Windows Azure: Major Updates for Mobile Backend Development

Tuesday, June 18, 2013 10:04 AM by ScottGu

@Jay,

>>>>> Is CORS still going to happen for direct access of Table and Blob storage, or are we expected to be required to use Mobile Services APIs to utilize CORS?  

CORS support is still planned - it isn't part of this release but will be enabled soon.

Hope this helps,

Scott

# re: Windows Azure: Major Updates for Mobile Backend Development

Tuesday, June 18, 2013 10:05 AM by ScottGu

@Ferdinand,

>>>> first of all very cool update! Im currently trying to do something that should be quite simple. In my custom API I want to join two tables of the mobile service. I was going to do that using the mssql object, but it seems that is not available? Is there a workaround for what I'm trying to do?

Can you send me email (scottgu@microsoft.com) and I'll connect you with the team on this.

Thanks,

Scott

# re: Windows Azure: Major Updates for Mobile Backend Development

Tuesday, June 18, 2013 10:06 AM by ScottGu

@peter,

>>>>> before this is all viable, the authentication providers just HAVE to be extended.

You'll see more support for Azure AD and Office 365 coming later this year.

Hope this helps,

Scott

# re: Windows Azure: Major Updates for Mobile Backend Development

Tuesday, June 18, 2013 10:06 AM by ScottGu

@Ruta/@Buddy,

>>>>>> I came here excited about Notification HUB, but looking into it, I see no pricing information and it is still a beta product? When will it be ready for serious uses?

Notification Hubs are still in preview - we will publish pricing information on them shortly.

Hope this helps,

Scott

# re: Windows Azure: Major Updates for Mobile Backend Development

Tuesday, June 18, 2013 10:07 AM by ScottGu

@mikesh_iis,

>>>>>> Scott, I wonder is the notification hub internals based on SignalR framework?

It is actually implemented internally using our Service Bus - but you'll see some nice SignalR integration soon.

Hope this helps,

Scott

# re: Windows Azure: Major Updates for Mobile Backend Development

Wednesday, June 19, 2013 5:35 AM by Gluwer

@ScottGu

It ended up that you have to be the admin of the subscription (as mentioned on forum) and I was using co-admin account. After the switch all worked fine except 500 error in portal (but the git repo was created anyway after a delay).

So after a few bumps all ended up well. Thanks.

# re: Windows Azure: Major Updates for Mobile Backend Development

Thursday, June 20, 2013 9:28 AM by WilliamMccray

Any upgrade on the "Pooling" of MSDN Subscribers Designer Sources for a company?   I very much so want to use the Pink VM things, but my organization will not allow even dev web servers to be straight managed by the Designers.

# re: Windows Azure: Major Updates for Mobile Backend Development

Monday, June 24, 2013 8:50 PM by Paul Batum

@Ferdinand,

We had to make a few small changes to where the tables,push and mssql objects live in custom API scripts to make them play nicely with Node.js modules. You can access all of these via request.service. For example, to access mssql, use:

var mssql = request.service.mssql;

mssql.query(...);

# re: Windows Azure: Major Updates for Mobile Backend Development

Wednesday, July 31, 2013 8:49 AM by Larry

Hi Scott,

I really liked the feature of custom API. Thanks..